Guide: How to cite a Website in Oxford HUMSOC style

Guide: How to cite a Website in Oxford HUMSOC style

Cite A Website in Oxford HUMSOC style

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Use the following template to cite a website using the Oxford HUMSOC citation style. For help with other source types, like books, PDFs, or websites, check out our other guides. To have your reference list or bibliography automatically made for you, try our free citation generator.

Key:

Pink text = information that you will need to find from the source.
Black text = text required by the Oxford HUMSOC style.

Reference list

Place this part in your bibliography or reference list at the end of your assignment.

Template:

Author Surname, Author Initial. (Year Published). Title. Retrieved October 10, 2013, from <http://Website URL>

Example:

Indianapolis Museum of Art,. (2012). CRANACH DIGITAL ARCHIVE. Lucascranach.org. Retrieved June 5, 2014, from <http://www.lucascranach.org/object.php?&obj=US_IMA_2000-344_FR218&uid=793&page=1&fol=01_Overall&img=US_IMA_2000-344_FR218_2006_Overall.tif#>

In-text citation

Place this part right after the quote or reference to the source in your assignment.

Template

(Author Surname Year Published)

Example

Cranach's Crucifixion should be seen in light of Luther's ideas. The emphasis upon the recognition of Christ's sacrifice by witnesses to his death on the Cross is a clear reference to one of the central tenets of Lutheran theology: that sinful mankind can be reconciled to God only by faith in the atoning sacrifice of Christ. The scene is crowded with figures that are symbolically arrayed at the right and left hand of Christ. To his right, the Virgin collapses into the arms of John the Evangelist, while the grieving Magdalene embraces the Cross. The Good Thief and Longinus, the Roman spear bearer who converted at Christ's death, gaze directly at him. They are contrasted with the brutish soldiers on his left, who ignore him and cast lots for his garments at the foot of the Cross. Cranach positioned the contemporary figures of a monk, a cardinal, and a Turk behind the Cross, among the unenlightened. (Indianapolis Museum of Art 2012)

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